Media Ecology - Asian Carp Billboards

part of Reshaping the Shape: Embodiment, Ecology, and Culture of a Postnatural Fish with Sarah Lewison

2019

All American Carp
Asian_Carp_billboard_superfood
Eat the River, Heal the River
All-American Carp


As abundant, nutritious, and delicious as Asian Carp are in the Mississippi watershed,hardly anyone eats them. They make up the vast majority of biomass in some waterways, pose a jumping haze and for this reason are consider an invasive pest.  They are vilified by conservationists and boaters alike, and yet still little is being done to make eco-logical use of this fish as a healthy and sustainable food source in a way that could help re-balance the riverine ecology of the Mississippi and its tributaries.

As part of our project Reshaping the Shape, Sarah Lewison and I designed a series of billboards that were in view along roadsides of southern Illinois promoting Bighead and Silver Asian Carp as under-utilized natural resources, superfoods, and as naturalized part of the Midwest, rather than a "alien invader" which is now so integrated in ecosystem that it can never practicably be eradicated.

Texts about the Reshaping the Shaping include -

“What on Earth”: Confluences in the planetary metabolism (AY)

The Possibility of All Species in an “All Species Parade” (AY)

Defensive Ecologies: Extracting Asian Carp from the Illinois River  (AY)

Of Forests, of Rivers, and of Meals (SL)

Imagining an Economy Based on Care (SL & AY)

SIU Exhibition page

Carp Convivals page

All Species Parade page

There is also an overview of Reshaping the Shape, of Deep Time Chicago's Field Station #4, and for the HKW project Mississippi: An Anthropocene River.

 

Asian_Carp_billboard_superfood

Asian Carp are actually on of the most nutritious and sustainable fish available - plentiful, wild caught, hing in protein and omega-3 faatty acids, low in heavy metals, and tasty, this fish is actually a natural superfood. The Asian Carp fishery in the Mississippi primarily ships the catch to Asia, while it is almost completely neglected in the diet of Midwestern Americans.